Solar Technologies go Hybrid
an initiative of Bayerisches Staatsministerium für Bildung und Kultus, Wissenschaft und Kunst
 

About SolTech

SolTech is an interdisciplinary project initiated by the Government of Bavaria to explore innovative concepts for converting solar energy into electricity and non-fossil fuels. SolTech complements research by chemists and physicists at five different Bavarian Universities and is funded with 50 million Euro.
SolTech is an interdisciplinary project initiated by the Government of Bavaria to explore innovative concepts for converting solar energy into electricity and non-fossil fuels. SolTech complements research by chemists and physicists at five Bavarian Universities and is funded with 50 million Euro.
Humanity will exhaust the Earth’s supply of fossil fuels in the foreseeable future. Non-fossil energy sources, such as sunlight, cannot yet replace current fossil and nuclear fuels on a satisfactory level. Chemists and physicists of five Bavarian universities  joined together in the state funded new research network Solar Technologies go Hybrid (SolTech) to synergize their research and explore the full use of sunlight as the principal energy source of our planet.
The SolTech network covers all fields of research on solar energy use, i.e. the conversion of solar energy to electricity for immediate use and the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy  for storage and future use.

Students benefit from the new network

New research methods and insights into the chemistry and physics of photoactive materials are naturally integrated into teaching. Lectures and courses  covering the forefront of solar technology research enable students to not only learn from the best, but also to do their share for a reliable energy supply as future scientists.

Network of Key Labs  

Each of the five universities has set up a well-equipped SolTech key laboratory. The new laboratories complement each other with their individual research expertise and high-tech equipment. In northern Bavaria, research is focused on organic materials: Bayreuth concentrates on polymers, while in Wurzburg small molecules that combine into larger functional units form the center of attention. In Erlangen, researchers are experts on innovative carbon materials such as graphene. The TUM and LMU in Munich conduct research on inorganic materials and hybrid organic-inorganic nanosystems.
At the FAU in Erlangen and both Munich Universities SolTech research is tightly interwoven with the efforts of the Excellence Initiative of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG.